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Morrigan

What's the most recent book you read? Fiction or non-fiction

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I am reading 'When The Body Says No - the cost of hidden stress' by Gabor Mate. It is extremely interesting in that rather than just saying that stress contributes to illness, it goes into a lot of depth to look at exactly what types of stress and exactly what types of illness. There are only a few books around on this topic, at least in this amount of depth and from a psychological exploration viewpoint - another is The Healing Power of Illness by Thorwald Dethlefsen.

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Whoa!! That's pretty heavy duty reading. I couldn't tackle that - - I'd be afraid that my head would explode!!!

 

I'm reading a light weight mystery novel. ''Hounded" by David Rosenfelt.

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Dave, I love David Rosenfelt. All of his mysteries feature dogs in both the titles and in the story lines. Also I love his humor, which is somewhat rare among mystery writers. Unfortunately I have read all of his books and can only wait for the next release.

 

I've been an avid reader since age 6. I read a ton of the heavy text book stuff and great literature long ago. I used to actually sneer at mystery writers, thinking they did not write quality books. And, a few of them don't. On the other hand, I loved Nancy Drew detective books at an early age. Anyhow, for the past couple of years, I have been plowing my way through the mystery book genre. My latest find is British writer, Peter James, who has written an entire series featuring Brighton Detective Superintendent Roy Grace, of which I'm reading book number 12, "Love You Dead."

 

An ugly duckling as a child, Jodie Bentley had two dreams in life - to be beautiful and rich. She's achieved the first, with a little help from a plastic surgeon, and now she's working hard on the second. Her philosophy on money is simple: you can either earn it or marry it. Marrying is easy, it's getting rid of the husband afterwards that's harder, that takes real skill. But hey, practice makes perfect . . .

 

Edited by Sandy

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Dave, I love David Rosenfelt. All of his mysteries feature dogs in both the titles and in the story lines. Also I love his humor, which is somewhat rare among mystery writers. Unfortunately I have read all of his books and can only wait for the next release.

 

I've been an avid reader since age 6. I read a ton of the heavy text book stuff and great literature long ago. I used to actually sneer at mystery writers, thinking they did not write quality books. And, a few of them don't. On the other hand, I loved Nancy Drew detective books at an early age. Anyhow, for the past couple of years, I have been plowing my way through the mystery book genre. My latest find is British writer, Peter James, who has written an entire series featuring Brighton Detective Superintendent Roy Grace, of which I'm reading book number 12, "Love You Dead."

 

An ugly duckling as a child, Jodie Bentley had two dreams in life - to be beautiful and rich. She's achieved the first, with a little help from a plastic surgeon, and now she's working hard on the second. Her philosophy on money is simple: you can either earn it or marry it. Marrying is easy, it's getting rid of the husband afterwards that's harder, that takes real skill. But hey, practice makes perfect . . .

Have to make a note of that, Sandy. Your clip has a bit of the sarcastic humour that I enjoy. I'm also nearing the end of Rosenfelt's novels, both the Andy Carpenter series and his other straight thrillers. Good writer.

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Dave, I love David Rosenfelt. All of his mysteries feature dogs in both the titles and in the story lines. Also I love his humor, which is somewhat rare among mystery writers. Unfortunately I have read all of his books and can only wait for the next release.

 

I've been an avid reader since age 6. I read a ton of the heavy text book stuff and great literature long ago. I used to actually sneer at mystery writers, thinking they did not write quality books. And, a few of them don't. On the other hand, I loved Nancy Drew detective books at an early age. Anyhow, for the past couple of years, I have been plowing my way through the mystery book genre. My latest find is British writer, Peter James, who has written an entire series featuring Brighton Detective Superintendent Roy Grace, of which I'm reading book number 12, "Love You Dead."

 

An ugly duckling as a child, Jodie Bentley had two dreams in life - to be beautiful and rich. She's achieved the first, with a little help from a plastic surgeon, and now she's working hard on the second. Her philosophy on money is simple: you can either earn it or marry it. Marrying is easy, it's getting rid of the husband afterwards that's harder, that takes real skill. But hey, practice makes perfect . . .

Dave, there really is no humor in the books of Peter James. BUT, I happened onto a treasure trove of books by an Italian author, Andrea Camilleri. His series, featuring the somewhat quirky Inspector Salvo Montalbano, combine humor, mystery and great writing. There are at least 20 books in the series and I have to pace myself so that I don't read one after another after another.

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Lightweight ... But suits my practical nature and good intentions.

 

Yoshiko Tsukiori "Stylish Party Dresses" to sew, 26 patterns that the Japanese always make look so simple to run up.

 

As I have learnt fabric choice is everything !

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Oooohh! "Stylish Party Dresses"!!! Sounds like my next read.:hurt:

 

So much for me but my wife enjoys this subject and actually had a small home based business constructing wedding and pageant gowns, along with other clothing items by order.

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I read a comprehensive and exhaustively researched biography of John Lennon by the American writer Tim Riley. "Lennon: The Man, The Myth, The Music: The Definitive Life." Unfortunate in some ways, as, though I now understand Lennon a lot more, I like him less. Oh well.

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I read a comprehensive and exhaustively researched biography of John Lennon by the American writer Tim Riley. "Lennon: The Man, The Myth, The Music: The Definitive Life." Unfortunate in some ways, as, though I now understand Lennon a lot more, I like him less. Oh well.

Curious about Lennon... What do you like less about him ?

Given most 'stars' need to be an extrovert, have a thick skin, truckloads of confidence, more front than Harrods, and be ego driven ? Talent and good looks also help !

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Oooohh! "Stylish Party Dresses"!!! Sounds like my next read.:hurt:

 

So much for me but my wife enjoys this subject and actually had a small home based business constructing wedding and pageant gowns, along with other clothing items by order.

Good Dave when I come unstuck with the Japanese translation - or my lower bobbin jams ! ...can I contact your wife for advice amidst my salty tears.

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I read a comprehensive and exhaustively researched biography of John Lennon by the American writer Tim Riley. "Lennon: The Man, The Myth, The Music: The Definitive Life." Unfortunate in some ways, as, though I now understand Lennon a lot more, I like him less. Oh well.

Well V there a few things, tempered a bit by understanding. But chief among them: (1) The tendency to commit extreme violence, especially when drunk but never very far below the surface, on those closest to him. The number of friends or close associates he beat up is disturbing, most disturbing of all Stuart Sutcliffe in Hamburg. There is more than a suggestion in the book of a connection between the extreme violence of this incident and Sutcliffe's untimely death from a brain haemorrhage not that long after. (2) The serial and unapologetic philandering (at least with Cynthia; the later philandering with May Pang while on a break with Yoko seems to have had her tacit or even active support), and, connected, the quite abysmal parenting of Julian which verged on abusive to my eye. (3) The nastiness and egocentrism of his attitude to Paul especially after the break-up as exemplified by How Do You Sleep which to me is a staggeringly nasty lyric that shocks even now. Yes he was a great and I will always love his music, his part in the Beatles story, his fierce intelligence and his incredible wit and wordplay. But I am realistic about the ramifications of his terrible and unlucky childhood. He was not a good man, I do not think.

Edited by Baldrick

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I read a comprehensive and exhaustively researched biography of John Lennon by the American writer Tim Riley. "Lennon: The Man, The Myth, The Music: The Definitive Life." Unfortunate in some ways, as, though I now understand Lennon a lot more, I like him less. Oh well.

Quite agree Balders, from what I have heard and read, John Lennon perpetrated great cruelty on numerous people close to him, which is typical for people with his type of damage - they lash out with great ferocity at loved ones and friends. Not a nice man, quite separate from his musical genius of course.

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interesting as just last week I saw a TV documentary called "Lennon NYC " made in 2010. It contained footage from after the Beatles breakup, of John's new life in NYC, so from 1971.

 

Funny how he promoted Peace while apparently causing such angst in his personal life.

I always did feel sorry for Cynthia and Julian, left behind when they did not fit into his new life and ideals. However he certainly appeared to relish being a stay at home Dad to Sean with excerpts showing him even baking bread.

Not surprisingly most of the guests interviewed spoke highly of his US persona, - but then they would wouldn't they ?

The film maker is not likely to make this film, ( a homage to Lennon ) and keep in any derogatory vignettes.

Edited by Versailles
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interesting as just last week I saw a TV documentary called "Lennon NYC " made in 2010. It contained footage from after the Beatles breakup, of John's new life in NYC, so from 1971.

 

Funny how he promoted Peace while apparently causing such angst in his personal life.

I always did feel sorry for Cynthia and Julian, left behind when they did not fit into his new life and ideals. However he certainly appeared to relish being a stay at home Dad to Sean with excerpts showing him even baking bread.

Not surprisingly most of the guests interviewed spoke highly of his US persona, - but then they would wouldn't they ?

The film maker is not likely to make this film, ( a homage to Lennon ) and keep in any derogatory vignettes.

V I would like to see that documentary, thanks for mentioning, I hadn't heard of it. I would like to see it to restore some balance. Not to say Riley (American author of the book I read) wasn't fair, he was trying to be, scrupulously. But the negative messages I took out came through anyway.

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The Fortunate Brother ... Donna Morrisey.... last in a trilogy about the "Now" family. Excellent book.

 

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I hardly ever read fiction these days, but I came across a newish novel in the library recently called "English Animals" by Laura Kaye and i'm really enjoying it. It's about a young woman from Eastern Europe who leaves her home because she is gay and her family turn against her. (That is not part of the narrative but she mentions it). It is about the young woman, Mirka - going to live with an eccentric young married couple who live in her family pile somewhere in the Shires - and make their living by running a B&B, holding weddings, and his taxidermy business. It's extremely well written and engaging.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/English-Animals-Laura-Kaye/dp/140870823X

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I always have two books on the go at any time. These are generally an autobiography and a novel of fairly light fiction ~ often romantic fiction. This week I have just finished the autobiography of Laila Ali (daughter of Muhammad.) I chose it mainly because I'm interested in boxing but the story of her young life before she took up boxing was probably the most interesting part. It really gave me an insight into her character. While she talks respectfully of her famous father, the book paints a picture of a distant man who was always surrounded by hangers on, giving her a childhood that was always invaded by strangers. This is an extremely well written book. I read Nicola Adams book a few weeks ago and found it lukewarm by comparison. I love biographies that tell you a lot about how a person felt, rather than just chronicling events, and this is one of those books. A fascinating fact is that Laila took up boxing not because of her father, but after seeing the Irish boxer, Deidre Gogarty fighting in 1996 on pay per view TV on the undercard of Tyson v Bruno.

 

The other book I am reading is the second book of Diane Chamberlain's Keeper of the Light trilogy. I have read about eight or nine of her books and love the easy style and the engaging story lines.

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I recently finished The Beak of the Finch by Jonathan Weiner. In short it is a book about evolutionary biology. I am now reading Don't Know Much About History by Kenneth Davis. It is about unusual things in mostly American History, especially myths or things people misbelieve such as the mythical Betsy Ross, or that George Washington held prayer vigils in Valley Forge.

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I am currently reading Julie Myerson's novel "The Stopped Heart" . Mary, a former publicist, is left devastated by the deaths of her children. Together with her husband, Graham, she attempts to build a new life in an isolated rural cottage in Suffolk.

Eliza is a 13-year-old farmer’s daughter, living in the same house a century earlier. Her world is thrown into disarray when a red-haired stranger is discovered after a storm, all wiles and sinister charm, is taken in by her parents and never leaves.

 

I like Julie Myerson's novels - she is one of the few novelists that I try and look at every book she brings out.

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I'm reading yet another of Diane Chamberlain's books. As a writer myself I am totally envious of her seemingly endless supply of engaging plots.

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I am reading the Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese, who passed away this winter at 60 years of age. It is a Canadian novel about a 16 year old native boy who is summoned to take his estranged father to a resting place to die, as his liver gives out from alcoholism. Because I worked for so many years in the bad area of Vancouver I feel like I have met the father a hundred times. Richard was not done writing - more books would have come but I am thankful that he got to finish this book, his last novel.

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"Could It Be Forever" by David Cassidy - I read this book mainly because I bought the Kindle version which was only 99p! David Cassidy was a big part of my growing up, and I believe for a couple of others here, too. I had not previously read a book about him. This is autobiographical - and the early years of his life and fame, in particular I found interesting. He wasn't a very talented musician or song writer, but wanted to be one. What he did get to become was a teen idol, which he soon discovered was not a very comfortable thing to be at all.

He had a lot of insight into parts of himself - so he should have - having had so much therapy - but other bits he was not at all aware of - like his nauseating name dropping all the time, he had a terrible insecurity and need to big himself up. The book ended before his final descent into penury and alcoholism.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Could-Be-Fo...+david+cassidy

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I'm so glad @Morrigan revived this reading thread. I'm an avid reader, have been since age 6, and, to this day, would rather read than watch TV. The book I am reading, "Before We Were Yours," is classified as historical fiction. It is one of those riveting page turners one reads late into the night and early morning. I believe that Amazon's review describes it best. [I] From the 1920s through 1950, thousands of children of single mothers and poverty-stricken parents were taken away — sometimes even quietly whisked off front porches or from hospital maternity wards — by the Tennessee Children’s Home Society and its Memphis branch director, Georgia Tann. While heartbroken birth mothers searched for their stolen sons and daughters, the children were often kept in unlicensed boarding facilities and given new names and histories before being advertised for adoption to families who could afford to pay. Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family’s Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge—until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children’s Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents—but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility’s cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger and uncertainty. Aiken, South Carolina, present day. Born into wealth and privilege, Avery Stafford seems to have it all: a successful career as a federal prosecutor, a handsome fiancé, and a lavish wedding on the horizon. But when Avery returns home to help her father weather a health crisis, a chance encounter leaves her with uncomfortable questions and compels her to take a journey through her family’s long-hidden history, on a path that will ultimately lead either to devastation or to redemption. Based on one of America’s most notorious real-life scandals—in which Georgia Tann, director of a Memphis-based adoption organization, kidnapped and sold poor children to wealthy families all over the country—Lisa Wingate’s riveting, wrenching, and ultimately uplifting tale reminds us how, even though the paths we take can lead to many places, the heart never forgets where we belong.[/i]

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Picked up a novel by an author who I've always enjoyed, James Lee Burke. In the "new books" section at the library was a 2018 offering, "Robicheaux". Another in his long line of novels surrounding the Louisiana police detective, Dave Robicheaux.

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I have finished Hilary Clintons latest book and am now reading a book by Gloria Hunniford. I do like fiction too but these are two books I got for Christmas.

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