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Versailles

Spring has sprung

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I am taking advantage of our Australian Spring weather when my garden looks it's most colourful, and it is not too hot to do some weeding, raking and fertilising.

 

I have bought some clay to mix in with the sandy soil in the hope it will retain some water this summer and the plants can actually thrive instead is just survive.

it is hard work gardening on a sandy limestone plain. I have given up trying to grow English type plants and now just stick in succulents that I know can survive the 40degree centigrade summer heat.

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I get a lot of satisfaction looking out at my garden but wonder how long I can continue with the upkeep - time to sell and downsize when it becomes a chore rather than a pleasure.

 

do you have an indoor plant, a tub of herbs on a patio or a brick backyard to cope with ?

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Your plants are pretty, Versailles. Like you, we have chalky limestone soil here, but it isn't hot or sandy! It means some alkaline loving plants grow quite well, mainly blue ones. We have a large patio at the back of our house, and I have quite a few tubs on it in summer. There is a bed down one side of it which I use for herbs, although I recently dug out a massive sage bush and replaced it with a fuschia, as I was forever cutting it back, and rarely use sage in cooking. I generally have a couple of pelargoniums on the patio in summer, and usually bring one into our small conservatory to overwinter as it looks pretty.

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Your plants are pretty, Versailles. Like you, we have chalky limestone soil here, but it isn't hot or sandy! It means some alkaline loving plants grow quite well, mainly blue ones. We have a large patio at the back of our house, and I have quite a few tubs on it in summer. There is a bed down one side of it which I use for herbs, although I recently dug out a massive sage bush and replaced it with a fuschia, as I was forever cutting it back, and rarely use sage in cooking. I generally have a couple of pelargoniums on the patio in summer, and usually bring one into our small conservatory to overwinter as it looks pretty.

Wow sage really grows that well there .. I am surprised as it usually likes a Mediterranean climate - but the lack of watering in Perth means my spindly plant dies each year.

pity as the leaves (used in a tea) is good for gastric problems, throat gargle for sore throats and memory loss.... I might have to buy another plant !

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Your plants are pretty, Versailles. Like you, we have chalky limestone soil here, but it isn't hot or sandy! It means some alkaline loving plants grow quite well, mainly blue ones. We have a large patio at the back of our house, and I have quite a few tubs on it in summer. There is a bed down one side of it which I use for herbs, although I recently dug out a massive sage bush and replaced it with a fuschia, as I was forever cutting it back, and rarely use sage in cooking. I generally have a couple of pelargoniums on the patio in summer, and usually bring one into our small conservatory to overwinter as it looks pretty.

I remember trying sage when I had really bad menopausal symptoms, which it was supposed to ease, but I can't say it did. I am not really that keen on the taste, either, although sage & onion stuffing is nice. I have also got mint, parsley, rosemary and horseradish in my herb bed. I planted 2 roots of horseradish a few years ago and now I can't get rid of it! It really is a weed.

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Have to share this photo of the magnificent Jacaranda tree (upside down sorry) ... It is in full flower but grow if next door.

 

Some suburbs have this as their street tree and the whole street is a mass of mauve blooms.. With lots of leaf litter but who cares the season is short !

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Have to share this photo of the magnificent Jacaranda tree (upside down sorry) ... It is in full flower but grow if next door.

 

Some suburbs have this as their street tree and the whole street is a mass of mauve blooms.. With lots of leaf litter but who cares the season is short !

So the trees "down under" really do grow upside down! ;-) how lovely, you are lucky. Spring seems an awful long way off here.

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I get a lot of satisfaction looking out at my garden but wonder how long I can continue with the upkeep - time to sell and downsize when it becomes a chore rather than a pleasure.

 

do you have an indoor plant, a tub of herbs on a patio or a brick backyard to cope with ?

Looks very nice Versailles! What is that yellow flowering bush?

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[quote name='Versailles' timestamp='1509523971']I get a lot of satisfaction looking out at my garden but wonder how long I can continue with the upkeep - time to sell and downsize when it becomes a chore rather than a pleasure. do you have an indoor plant, a tub of herbs on a patio or a brick backyard to cope with ? [/quote] No @Morgen ...not yellow - it's actually a green leathery fern, but under the patio roofing it took on a yellow tinge in the photo. Not sure what it is called but it is hardy and I have divided it a few times so far to share with friends.

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We have returned from holiday to find our spring beds have really broken out so I am going to post some snaps in this thread, one photo at a time. Mainly tulips but some of the earlier spring bulbs are still with us and the forget-me-nots have started too.

 

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Edited by Baldrick
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More tulips planted by @Morrigan last autumn. Worth the investment and wait. And don’t forget a few forget-me-nots. [attachment=4871:name]
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Buddha overseeing our new bed, planted by @Morrigan last autumn where the top pond used to be. Also note new green lizard helping. [attachment=4872:name]
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We have returned from holiday to find our spring beds have really broken out so I am going to post some snaps in this thread, one photo at a time. Mainly tulips but some of the earlier spring bulbs are still with us and the forget-me-nots have started too.

 

[ATTACH=JSON]{"alt":"Click image for larger version Name:\tFAFE582F-4662-4846-B20F-E5B45EB56F89.jpeg Views:\t1 Size:\t239.4 KB ID:\t87340","data-align":"none","data-attachmentid":"87340","data-size":"medium"}[/ATTACH]

I probably shouldn't "like" my own work but in this case I feel justified ;-)

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I love these gardens! Thank you all for sharing these beautiful photos. I have NO talent for gardening, so I greatly admire your work.

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[quote name='Baldrick' timestamp='1524241771']More tulips planted by @Morrigan last autumn. Worth the investment and wait. And don’t forget a few forget-me-nots. [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"medium","data-attachmentid":87343}[/ATTACH][/quote] Stunning.. I am so envious as sadly bulbs like tulips and daffodils just don't do well in our sandy soils and warm temps.

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We have returned from holiday to find our spring beds have really broken out so I am going to post some snaps in this thread, one photo at a time. Mainly tulips but some of the earlier spring bulbs are still with us and the forget-me-nots have started too.

 

[ATTACH=JSON]{"alt":"Click image for larger version Name:\tFAFE582F-4662-4846-B20F-E5B45EB56F89.jpeg Views:\t1 Size:\t239.4 KB ID:\t87340","data-align":"none","data-attachmentid":"87340","data-size":"medium"}[/ATTACH]

Love the forget me nots sprinkled in amongst the other colours. well done ! Is the soil well draining ?

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[quote name='Baldrick' timestamp='1524241611']We have returned from holiday to find our spring beds have really broken out so I am going to post some snaps in this thread, one photo at a time. Mainly tulips but some of the earlier spring bulbs are still with us and the forget-me-nots have started too. [ATTACH=JSON]{"alt":"Click image for larger version Name:\tFAFE582F-4662-4846-B20F-E5B45EB56F89.jpeg Views:\t1 Size:\t239.4 KB ID:\t87340","data-align":"none","data-attachmentid":"87340","data-size":"medium"}[/ATTACH][/quote] @Versailles I will take it on myself as under-gardener and poster to reply on the gardener’s behalf. In short, yes. Our soil is chalky and drains well. Blue flowers tend to do quite well here. Although at the moment due to an incredibly wet winter and spring the water table is high, so not draining quite as well as usual. We actually would like the soil to be a bit more acid so we could grow things like camellias and in particular magnolias which we saw a lot of on our recent holiday by the sea.

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Winter in the garden in Oz.

 

A few bare trees as most Australian trees are not deciduous, lots of lush green weeds and a bountiful crop of citrus fruit.

 

just picked these grapefruit from my backyard ...the oranges were plentiful this year and so sweet and juicy, also had lots of mandarins that were a lovely bright orange colour, juicy but not so sweet... where is that recipe for marmalade ?

 

I like my garden to be productive as well as pretty but fruit crops need a lot of pest control even though I try not to spray chemicals.

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Have I really been posting on Ziboom this long ?

Spring is due again ...on 1st September officially in Australia but today was cold, wet and miserable -just 14 degrees Celsiuis all day.

 

We were going to drive a couple of hundred kilometres away into sheep farming country to Dowerin to attend an old fashioned country field show with farm equipment for sale, cattle and other animals to look at and all the fun of the fair. I saw that the Benedictine Monastery at New Norcia nearby takes in guests for the night, early mass with the monks, breakfast with bread made in their wood fired oven and a tour of the priceless art works in the museum. I cancelled when we had such high winds and rain. Maybe later when I can see all the wildflowers too ..in sunshine !

 

However a a quick trip into my back garden in between showers this afternoon and I can see that the soil must be warming up, there are green leaves shooting on deciduous shrubs and the first flowers are in bloom.

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Size matters ... Trying to be self sufficient in summer salad vegetables this year so lots of planting, toiling, mulching and fertilising going on.

Hoping not to use pesticides before harvesting in the summer months from December onwards.

 

I have planted: cos lettuce, tomatoes, capsicum, beetroot, kale, spinach, rocket, coriander, basil, chives.

 

Some are in a raised garden bed and others in large pots so I can move them in and out of the ferocious Aussie sun.

Although many of these vegetables and herbs may be cheap to buy at the shops, there is the convenience of stepping out back and picking a few basil leaves and tomatoes for a salad.

 

Anyone else like or have the time to tend “grow your own†?

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BEAUTIFUL! I wish I had the patience and ''green thumb'' you do. Thank you for sharing!

 

Here in California, we've had to go to low or no water gardens/lawns due to water crises. Once we get our near zeroscaping yard in place (sometime next year), I'll post photos.

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BEAUTIFUL! I wish I had the patience and ''green thumb'' you do. Thank you for sharing!

 

Here in California, we've had to go to low or no water gardens/lawns due to water crises. Once we get our near zeroscaping yard in place (sometime next year), I'll post photos.

We have water restrictions here too..only 10 minutes twice a week, but vegetables need more so you can hand water in the early morming before the heat. I even save buckets if grey water from the shower or rinsing water from washing. Envious of the luxurious green in other countries.

...Look forward to seeing some photos.

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Spring has sprung version 2019 ..lots of sun and blue skies without the heat. 

 

I am enjoying having my back window open and letting the glorious perfume from the Chilean Jasmin creeper than I planted a few years ago to cover an ugly garden shed, waft in. 

 

Originally from South America - it is classified as a weed in some parts of Australia, but I love  it as it takes full sun or shade and apart from throwing a handful of fertiliser at it 3 times a year - 79B3CED1-0614-4EA8-8CF1-5A71DFF7B99F.thumb.jpeg.93cfee15d0d0a21325cd00bd1fa86f3a.jpeg I leave it alone. 

 

 

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