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Morrigan

Class systems in British and US society

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Everyone knows that Britain has a socioeconomic class system, it has existed since the Middle Ages. This article claims there are currently 7 different classes, including the elite, new affluent workers, and the "precariat" ie the poorest underclass.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukn...ou-fit-in.html

 

But it is less commonly acknowledged that the USA also has a class system, this article claims there are 6 classes: http://www.sparknotes.com/sociology/...lity/section6/

  1. Upper class
  2. New money
  3. Middle class
  4. Working class
  5. Working poor
  6. Poverty level

Sociological study of economic and social standing can help in social and welfare planning, house building, and many other things, but do you personally recognise this in the people around you? Do you think that there is a racial element, particularly in the USA? Some people think so - and go further to say that America has a "caste" system based on race. http://theconversation.com/does-amer...e-system-89118

 

For members not in these two countries, do you think your country has a class system? I am particularly thinking of Australia.

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In my experience there is now little left of the very structured class system in Australia that has existed in the UK in the past.

 

The class system is now also very fluid, so that people are able to freely move (hopefully always in an upward direction) from working class to middle or upper class ...if we even have such a thing as the later.

 

The old money families usually large pastoralists and land owners, judiciary and Government ministers from colonial Australia still exist but their prestige has been diluted.

 

i have found that there is little questioning about which school you went to, but there may be some judgement about which suburb you currently live in.

 

Studies show that younger attractive women can usually move quickly from one class to another !

 

There is an element in racism, and that combined with a lack of education facilities and suitable career opportunities means that Aboriginal people are often found in the working poor or poverty levels.

 

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In the US, the rich are getting richer, and we have had our anti-Wall Street movements. There is such an income disparity within economic classes, and it is quite distressing. However, I tend to think that America is far more invested in preserving all the natural rights and privileges that comes by way of race. For instance, the poorest and most uneducated trailer-living white person in this country will often see themselves far above any person of color, and they intend to keep it this way. Trump won the white vote across the board, from all economic and educational background. Is there any other reason to vote for such an incompetent pea brain?

 

However, there are more complex aspects to class in America, and much of it lays within cultural communities. In our "land of immigrants", you will find different groups with their own class system. Marcos-friendly era Filipinos, for instance, place themselves over other Filipinos because they are are the wealthy ruling class that benefited from Marcos' corruption. I had a Filipino cab driver complain about it while I was in San Francisco. He was very entertaining.

 

I am always surprised by the American love of rich people and money. We had to endure Paris Hilton and the Kardashians, society people who have nothing interesting to contribute to society other than sex videos and ass surgery. This is probably why Donald Trump has been allowed to flourish, because his image as a "rich American" has bamboozled so many people. However, being Jewish and wealthy does not get the same sort of Trump-ish reaction, as there are too many eejits willing to buy into the fantasy that such money was gained by ripping off a zillion people.

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I agree with Versailles re Australia

 

There is still some snobbery but there is also strong 'anti snobbery' - anyone who looks down on others too blatantly or makes name dropping or boasting comments about their background or their wealth is viewed quite poorly - the so-called Aussie battler is more admired than the silver spoon background types.

 

And i dont think we admire people just because they are rich - a successful businessman like Richard Branson (owner of Virgin airlines, among other things) is liked because of his down to earth larrikin image - the brash 'I'm rich and I flaunt it' type is not popular at all.

I think we like to see ourselves as a classless society and land of equal opportunity - an ideal rather than entirely factual, of course.

 

eg I remember Alexander Downer, a leading politician and once leader of the opposition - and his silver spoon accent and corresponding background was almost an impediment rather than an advantage for his public image.

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After my latest 5 week stay in the UK I think that most of the middle class snobbery and barriers have been broken down. 

 

I am sure that the upper class and aristocracy still retain their views of those ‘below stairs’ and possibly always will, but there seemed to be much more blending of classes with less emphasis on background imo. 

 

Maybe the making of money, wealth and all that goes with it is the new class system... Those that have been able to make moula through education, networking, luck and hard work and those on welfare and living below the poverty line. 

 

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One thing in US society that I don't quite understand is this "future millionaire" fantasy, that causes so many poor people to vote in favor of the very rich.  They do so with the belief that they, too, will one day be counted among the 1%.  Does this happen in the UK or Australia?

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I was once given a lift by the Grandmother of the present Duke of Westminster - a very down to earth lady.

 

I find the nouveau riche and the inheritors of great wealth far more objectionable on the whole.

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On 8/15/2019 at 4:17 PM, Anna said:

One thing in US society that I don't quite understand is this "future millionaire" fantasy, that causes so many poor people to vote in favor of the very rich.  They do so with the belief that they, too, will one day be counted among the 1%.  Does this happen in the UK or Australia?

 

No it doesn't - but we get lectured to by the millionaires who seem to think that if we aren't millionaires it's because we're lazy or stupid.

 

 

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For anybody thinking Richard Branson's "one of us"

 

From a couple of years ago.

...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

 

Virgin Richard Branson's company)  was successful in suing the NHS over a tendering battle – reportedly leaving a cash-strapped Clinical Commissioning Group with financial liabilities running to hundreds of thousands of pounds.

To trace back the roots of this scandal, we have to go back to the Coalition government. The Conservatives and Liberal Democrats in power pushed through the Health and Social Care Act 2012. One of the most singularly damaging pieces of legislation brought in in the last decade, the act has forced an increasingly fragmented and marketised internal structure on the NHS.

It is in this marketised environment that the predatory Virgin Care arm of Branson’s empire has thrived, as hospitals are pressured to overlook in-house NHS providers in favour of private healthcare companies. Currently, the firm is thought to hold well over £2 billion worth of contracts with our NHS.

But that is not enough for Branson. When the NHS in Surrey ran the tendering process for a contract to provide £82 million worth of children’s services – an expensive procedure forced on them by the Health and Social Care Act – it concluded that a consortium of mainly in-house NHS providers was best placed to provide the best care for patients.

The NHS awarded an NHS contract to NHS providers – arguably in the best interests of patients. Virgin Care, who bid against NHS providers for the contract, however, took issue with Surrey NHS bosses’ decision.

Virgin Care didn’t take their failure to win the contract as a judgement on the way they operated the services they already ran in Surrey. Instead, they stayed true to Richard Branson’s business motto of “failure is only the end if you decide to stop.” Branson’s healthcare firm didn’t stop. Instead, it rejected the Surrey’s conclusions and launched a bitter bid to sue our taxpayer-funded NHS.

................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

He doesn't pay tax in the U.K. either - he's one of the multi millionaire self serving scum and people who know what he's really like and still support him need their heads feeling. He cost the N.H.S. millions. This forcing the N.H.S. to compete with private companies is a disgrace.

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On 8/15/2019 at 4:17 PM, Anna said:

One thing in US society that I don't quite understand is this "future millionaire" fantasy, that causes so many poor people to vote in favor of the very rich.  They do so with the belief that they, too, will one day be counted among the 1%.  Does this happen in the UK or Australia?

 

I remember when I was doing A level sociology, the term for poor people voting Conservative - ie out of their class and for a party which wouldn't serve them - "aberrant voters".  The same would apply to someone wealthy voting Labour.  And yes it does happen, the former, I think more than the latter.  

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